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COCONUT NECTAR

Why it’s worth the swap.


COCONUT NECTAR

Crap was my first thought as I watched 40 litres of coconut nectar ever-so-slowly spread into a giant golden pancake across our kitchen floor. Perhaps we should have used refined sugar in our drinks; it’s much easier to clean up.

Apart from the sticky mess caused by a faulty container, spilling coconut nectar is an expensive business. Our expanding pancake set us back £192, compared to £17 for an equivalent pile of wasted sugar. But we think nectar’s worth it. Here’s why in case you’ve never heard of it.

Coconut nectar comes from coconut trees, naturally. It’s laborious to make involving tree climbing, tapping (or making a small incision in) the bottom of its flowers and then waiting several hours while collecting the runny honey looking nectar that slowly seeps out. (The flowers are completely fine and quickly recover to be tapped another day). Once collected, it’s slowly heated until the nectar resembles maple syrup, bottled and stored.

It has a few benefits compared to other ways to make things sweet. A squeeze of nectar provides more vitamins and minerals compared to a spoonful of sugar. It is low on something called the glycaemic index which means your body takes longer to make the most of it so you avoid a sugar crash. Angelina Jolie’s friends at the United Nations named coconut nectar the most sustainable sweetener in the world in 2014 due to coconut trees needing only a little water to keep them happy.

If you’re into cooking then you can swap it for normal sugar. It’s roughly the same sweetness and it works particularly well in baking.

If you’d like to give it a whirl then you can find it in supermarkets. Luckily, it’s sold in much more friendly little bottles rather than the extra large containers we use and occasionally spill.